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Pets and Ticks | Part 2

Now that we’ve covered how to identify the most common ticks that you may find on your pet in Pets and Ticks | Part 1, let’s go a little deeper and look at the diseases that those ticks can carry that can be transmitted to your pets.


It’s important to note that while both cats and dogs are susceptible to ticks, they are more common in dogs due to their limited personal grooming techniques.


Diseases Transmitted by Ticks

According to veterinary experts at VCA Animal Hospitals, ticks are efficient carriers of disease. Ticks are parasites that thrive by latching onto and feeding on the blood of their host. These pests can remain attached for a significant time before being noticed because hosts often don’t feel the initial bite.


Ticks feed on humans and other mammals, including dogs. Unfortunately, this makes our dogs susceptible to tick-borne diseases, including:


Anaplasmosis


  • Source: Black-legged tick

  • Region: Northeastern US, upper midwestern US, Pacific coast

  • Signs:

  • Can be carried without clinical signs

  • Low blood platelets (causing bleeding disorders)

  • Fever

  • Lameness

  • Limping

  • Joint pain/swelling

  • Enlarged lymph nodes

  • Lethargy

Babesiosis

  • Source: Black-legged tick

  • Region: Northeast US and upper midwest US

  • Signs:

  • Hemolysis (breaking down of red blood cells)

  • Lethargy

  • Pale gums

  • Dark colored urine

  • Jaundice (skin or eyes become yellow or orange)

Ehrlichiosis (or Ehrlichia)

  • Source: American Dog tick, Brown Dog tick, and Lone Star tick

  • Region: South Central US and the eastern US

  • Signs: appear within three weeks after the bite

  • Fever

  • Poor appetite

  • Low blood platelets (nose bleeding, bruising, anemia)

Lyme Disease

  • Source: Black-legged tick or Deer tick

  • Region: Northeast US, upper Midwest US, west coast US, and east coast US

  • Signs: appear about two to five months after the bite (many dogs carry without symptoms)

  • Fever

  • Lameness

  • Limping

  • Joint pain/swelling

  • Enlarged lymph nodes

  • Lethargy

  • Lyme disease can become fatal if it progresses to kidney disease.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

  • Source: American Dog tick

  • Region: North, South, and Central America

  • Signs: appear about two to five months after the bite (many dogs carry without symptoms)

  • Fever

  • Poor appetite

  • Swollen lymph nodes

  • Low platelets

  • Joint pain

  • Neurological signs (wobbliness)

Stay tuned for more in Pets and Ticks | Part 3 and 4!


Learn More About Pet Safety with Aloha Veterinary Acupuncture

While here at Aloha Veterinary Acupuncture, we specialize in acupuncture, our main priority is treating your pets with the aloha they deserve. That’s why we’re committed to helping you keep your pets safe through any means possible.


Sign up for our monthly newsletter for all of the latest tips and tricks to help keep your pet happy and healthy.


Of course, if you’re interested in what we do, you can learn more about the benefits of veterinary acupuncture, and feel free to contact us with any additional questions you might have. You can also schedule a video consultation with Dr. Kho, who can discuss your pet and address any questions or concerns you may have about veterinary acupuncture.

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